Cleaning Standards

Crime Scene, Suicide Scene and Death Cleaning

Crime scene cleaning can begin only after the authorities, coroners or police have released a scene.

Standard operating procedures similar to military regulations for disinfection of internal as well as external environments have evolved over the years and are accepted practice throughout the world.

The risks of coming into contact with biological hazards such as viral or bacterial contagions is so high at tragedy scenes that health and medical officials have long established procedures and techniques to protect workers who are cleaning a tragedy scene and more importantly, to ensure that pathogens are completely removed and remediated.  Standard operating procedures similar to military regulations for disinfection of internal as well as external environments have evolved over the years and are accepted practice throughout the world.

Crime Scene Cleanup Standards

In the United States the American Bio-Recovery Association [ABRA] is the accepted organization of this industry.  ABRA is an international non-profit association of crime scene clean up, trauma scene clean up, hoarding clean up, meth lab clean up recovery professionals who are dedicated to upholding the highest technical, ethical and educational guidelines of the bio hazard remediation industry.

Most importantly, cleaning standards must be followed to insure that a scene is restored completely to the pre-incident healthfulness before it can be certified to be safe for human occupancy.

Crime Scene Clean Up Certification

The Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification [IICRC] is the certifying body for Crime Scene Cleaning operators. The IICRC sets the standards for cleaning and inspection of carpets, furnishings, textiles and flooring. BioSpecialists is trained by ABRA and Certified by the IICRC.

 

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